Category Archive for 'Parent Tips'

Lead your child to good health

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020

Here’s an infographic from the American College of Pediatricians on ways to help your student live a balanced and healthy life:

Originally posted 2017-11-06 20:59:09. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

If it’s important

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2020

Originally posted 2018-06-17 22:46:46. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

You were born… 

Tuesday, June 16th, 2020

Originally posted 2017-01-16 17:17:34. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The Secret to a Well-Behaved Child: Regular Bedtime

Tuesday, June 9th, 2020

Young children who don’t have a regular bedtime behave worse than kids who go to sleep at the same time each night, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that both mothers and teachers rated 7-year-olds who had inconsistent bedtimes as being more hyperactive than their better-rested peers, and as having more social, emotional and conduct problems.

The results also revealed that behavior grew worse the more years a child spent without a firm bedtime. But the good news is that children’s behavior noticeably improved when they switched to a scheduled bedtime.

The study also linked having an earlier bedtime to better behavior. If you’re looking for a strategy to try at home to address behavior, a consistent or earlier bedtime might be worth considering.

Read the rest of the article here.

Originally posted 2013-10-14 07:18:32. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What to say to your student when things get tough

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2020

Has someone ever said to you, “Just try it, it’s easy!” and then you found out the task they coaxed you into trying was painfully difficult? Did this leave you feeling exceptionally capable or downright stupid…and embarrassed?

When this happens to the average adult, it doesn’t take long for them to conclude two things:

  • This person who’s trying to help me is nuts…and definitely not to be trusted!
  • Why should I try if I can’t even handle the easy stuff?

Quite frequently I overhear well-meaning parents and educators using the “Just try it, it’s easy!” approach in an attempt to urge a reluctant child into trying something they’re afraid of. When the child finds the task easy, all is right with the world. When they don’t, they’re confronted with the pain of seeing that they might be so slow that they can’t even do something really, really “easy”!

Keep reading to find out how to help motivate your student to keep working through difficult tasks.

Originally posted 2011-09-22 16:57:17. Republished by Blog Post Promoter