Category Archive for 'Parent Tips'

If you want something 

Tuesday, May 26th, 2020

Originally posted 2016-10-15 08:03:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The value of losing

Tuesday, May 19th, 2020

“…Loving parents allow their children to develop winning skills by allowing them to experience disappointments, make small mistakes, and experience the natural and logical consequences. Shielding them from all of life’s hardships sends the message that they aren’t strong enough to cope with their losses. Loving them through their sadness allows them to win every time they lose.”

Read the rest here.

Originally posted 2012-03-07 07:14:40. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

React vs. Respond

Tuesday, May 12th, 2020

The American College of Pediatricians has a good article about the difference between reacting versus responsding to kids.

Reacting means that you meet your child’s emotionally-charged behavior with your own emotionally-charged reply. Responding, on the other hand, gives your child permission to express their big emotions, ideas and feelings without criticism, shame or guilt.”

Read the rest here.

id1629695_228830-Do-You-React-Or-Respond-To-Your-Kids

Originally posted 2016-04-11 19:47:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

A simple way to boost responsibility

Tuesday, May 5th, 2020

File:2010-07-20 Black windup alarm clock face.jpgResponsibility is something on the mind of both parents and students. Parents want their students to be more responsible, and students are always asking for more options to make their own choices and take charge of their life more.

One simple tool can help both parents and students: an alarm clock.

This isn’t earth shattering! Get your student their own alarm clock and have them manage it, setting it for the appropriate time in the morning to take up. It’s a great way to teach responsibility. Maybe they’ll even forget to set it one time and you can teach them the consequences. Mistakes are a good teacher and right now the consequences are a lot smaller than oversleeping for work one day.

Parents, don’t be the alarm clock! This is an area your student can grow responsibility in. And while you’re at it, make sure your student’s bedtime and wake up time is allowing them 10 hours of sleep a night or so. This will give your student the brainpower they need to focus and learn through the day. We all know how it feels to try to get work done when we are feeling groggy.

Originally posted 2018-09-12 16:55:59. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Fly

Tuesday, April 28th, 2020

Originally posted 2017-02-25 09:47:42. Republished by Blog Post Promoter