A simple way to boost responsibility

File:2010-07-20 Black windup alarm clock face.jpgResponsibility is something on the mind of both parents and students. Parents want their students to be more responsible, and students are always asking for more options to make their own choices and take charge of their life more.

One simple tool can help both parents and students: an alarm clock.

This isn’t earth shattering! Get your student their own alarm clock and have them manage it, setting it for the appropriate time in the morning to take up. It’s a great way to teach responsibility. Maybe they’ll even forget to set it one time and you can teach them the consequences. Mistakes are a good teacher and right now the consequences are a lot smaller than oversleeping for work one day.

Parents, don’t be the alarm clock! This is an area your student can grow responsibility in. And while you’re at it, make sure your student’s bedtime and wake up time is allowing them 10 hours of sleep a night or so. This will give your student the brainpower they need to focus and learn through the day. We all know how it feels to try to get work done when we are feeling groggy.

Originally posted 2018-09-12 16:55:59. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

When you fail

Originally posted 2016-10-08 20:41:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The Secret to a Well-Behaved Child: Regular Bedtime

Young children who don’t have a regular bedtime behave worse than kids who go to sleep at the same time each night, a new study suggests.

British researchers found that both mothers and teachers rated 7-year-olds who had inconsistent bedtimes as being more hyperactive than their better-rested peers, and as having more social, emotional and conduct problems.

The results also revealed that behavior grew worse the more years a child spent without a firm bedtime. But the good news is that children’s behavior noticeably improved when they switched to a scheduled bedtime.

The study also linked having an earlier bedtime to better behavior. If you’re looking for a strategy to try at home to address behavior, a consistent or earlier bedtime might be worth considering.

Read the rest of the article here.

Originally posted 2013-10-14 07:18:32. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Does math practice make a difference?

There is some talk lately about if homework really helps students. For math, the answer is clearly yes.

To figure this out, one year I looked at the number of minutes of math practice my fourth grade students were completing at Khan Academy, a math practice website. I compared that to a student’s math level. Here are some facts to consider, using data from one fourth grade marking period:

  • The average number of minutes the class worked for the entire marking period was 800 minutes. The lowest value was 400 minutes, and the highest was 1750 minutes. So the hardest workers were working 400% more than the lax workers.
  • The top 25% of the class was working an average of 1300 minutes with an average math level of 5.1.
  • The bottom 25% of the class was working an average of 471 minutes with an average math level of 3.5.
  • The middle 50% of the class was right where you would expect them to be, in the middle of minutes worked and math level.

Here’s the data in a table, sorted by the number of minutes worked:

By Minutes WorkedAverageMinutes
Bottom 25%3.5471
Middle 50%4.4700
Top 25%5.11314
Class Average4.3796

It’s clear from above that the students that are spending the most time working are improving their math levels. The students practicing the least are below grade level.

Here’s the table sorted by math level:

By Math LevelAverageMinutes
Bottom 25%3.0543
Middle 50%4.5811
Top 25%5.51021
Class Average4.3796

What this table clearly shows is that the students that need the most practice, the lowest level math students, were working the least in the class. However, the average minutes in this table are higher for the bottom and middle percentiles than in the table that was sorted by minutes worked. That shows that some of the lower level students were spending more time trying to improve their math levels. Over time, that practice will pay off.

Two takeaways:

  1. Practice time makes a difference. While not a guarantee, the more time your student spends practicing math (or reading or any other subject) the better their level will be. This is why a daily homework time is essential.
  2. Grades will follow minutes. If your student has a lower math level than you would like, nothing is likely to change until you find ways for them to practice more at home. It would be great if your student would take initiative and practice on their own. But if they are struggling, it is likely that they are not practicing. You’ll need to step in and help them organize your time if you want to see a change. Over time, more practice will make a difference.

Originally posted 2017-12-04 15:41:19. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The time is right

Originally posted 2018-02-19 13:55:39. Republished by Blog Post Promoter