Lead your child to good health

Here’s an infographic from the American College of Pediatricians on ways to help your student live a balanced and healthy life:

Originally posted 2017-11-06 20:59:09. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Save most of your words for happy times

What’s the best way to make an otherwise effective technique backfire? It’s simple: Talk too much.

There exists a basic rule about doing discipline with kids of all ages:

The more words we use when our kids are acting up, 
the LESS effective we become.

Save most of your words for happy times.

What do you do during unhappy times? Show empathy, give choices, and let consequences do the heavy lifting. Here are more ideas.

Read the rest here.

Originally posted 2016-03-30 17:13:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Kids Who Desire World Domination

Do you know a strong-willed child? Someone who wants to run the show and lets everyone around them know it? Here are some words of wisdom:

Avoid getting on the same level

Kids with this personality will do a variety of things to bring us down to their level…or actually reverse the roles. These include arguing, nasty looks, passive resistance, etc. Remember: If a child can pull me into a debate or argument, I am no longer the parent.

Establish privacy boundaries

These children feel entitled to be involved in every conversation and every activity. When they aren’t, they create chaos to bring the focus back to them. “This is our time” or “This is a private conversation between your mom and me” or “You may stay with us as long as you aren’t interrupting” are very important boundaries.

Let your authority outlast theirs

Many children train their parents to stop setting and enforcing expectations. They do so by arguing, screaming, or yelling every time a limit is set or something is asked of them. No matter how difficult it may be, please show them that you will remain loving and strong. You’ll never regret this.

Read the rest here.

Originally posted 2015-12-16 16:36:22. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

You were born… 

Originally posted 2017-01-16 17:17:34. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Daily Homework Time

If homework is not automatic in your home, if it causes some battles, if you know there’s “got to be a better way,” consider Daily Homework Time. Your student will usually have only two kinds of homework: (1) stuff from class they didn’t finish, and (2) stuff they should work on at home to get better and smarter.

The second thing is called Daily Homework Time. The basic idea is for you set aside about 30-50 minutes Monday through Thursday for your student to get smarter; 30 minutes for 3rd graders, 40 minutes for 4th graders, or 50 minutes for 5th graders. Each night, they should practice some math, do some writing, and finish class homework. Other things might be to work on cursive, practice math facts, or work on spelling. There’s no such thing as, “I have no homework,” because there is always something to get better at, such as math practice or writing.

Your student probably won’t do this on their own. But with your guidance, you can help your student get into good habits of doing something every day to improve themselves (not to mention their grades).

Originally posted 2016-09-20 17:36:37. Republished by Blog Post Promoter