If you want something 

Originally posted 2016-10-15 08:03:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The greatest danger

id1538433080_22The-greatest-danger-for-most-of-us-is-not-that-we-aim-too-high-and-we-miss-it-but-we-aim-too-low-and-reach-it.22-Michelangelo

Originally posted 2016-03-26 08:21:19. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Fly

Originally posted 2017-02-25 09:47:42. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What to say to your student when things get tough

Has someone ever said to you, “Just try it, it’s easy!” and then you found out the task they coaxed you into trying was painfully difficult? Did this leave you feeling exceptionally capable or downright stupid…and embarrassed?

When this happens to the average adult, it doesn’t take long for them to conclude two things:

  • This person who’s trying to help me is nuts…and definitely not to be trusted!
  • Why should I try if I can’t even handle the easy stuff?

Quite frequently I overhear well-meaning parents and educators using the “Just try it, it’s easy!” approach in an attempt to urge a reluctant child into trying something they’re afraid of. When the child finds the task easy, all is right with the world. When they don’t, they’re confronted with the pain of seeing that they might be so slow that they can’t even do something really, really “easy”!

Keep reading to find out how to help motivate your student to keep working through difficult tasks.

Originally posted 2011-09-22 16:57:17. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The importance of self-control

Have you heard of the Marshmallow Test? Here’s an idea of what it’s about:

Researchers at Stanford created this simple test measure self-control in a student. What they found is that two-thirds of the students couldn’t delay their gratification to wait for something better. But one-third of those students did show self-control.

And after many years, researchers checked-in with those students to see how they were doing. Every single one of them were successful! It seems that their ability to show self-control helped them focus on what was important and to delay gratification. That helped them focus on the “big picture,” persevere through difficulties, and to steer clear of negative choices.

So what can we learn from this? Self-control and waiting for what we want is important. It’s something worth trying to develop at school and home. See if you can find ways to help your student learn to wait for what he wants: TV shows, video games, playing, using technology, snacks. If students can learn to wait for small things now, they may be able to use this self-control in bigger more important issues later.

Here’s another video about this research.

Originally posted 2016-09-19 17:45:28. Republished by Blog Post Promoter