If you really want to do something… 

Originally posted 2016-07-16 08:18:47. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

How to avoid power struggles with stubborn kids

When kids get stubborn, adults are tempted to turn up the heat by making demands, raising voices, making threats, and showing we mean business. To stubborn kids, that’s a challenge they would love to take you up on.

To reduce the chance of a power struggle, here’s a Love and Logic tip:

1. Approach slowly as if you haven’t a care in the world.
2. Ask nicely, “Will you ______________, just for me? Thanks!”
3. Act cool, turn tail, and slowly walk away.

Research has demonstrated that the odds of getting into a nasty power struggle with a kid dramatically decrease when we’re no longer around them. The true science has to do with expectations and the fact that people will live up to…or down to…the ones we communicate. What expectation do we send when we ask someone to do something and then stare at them? The message is clear: “You’re not going to do this for me.”

In contrast, what expectation is sent when we make the very same request yet move away? The message is far more positive: “This is a win-win situation. I know you’ll help me out.”

Read the rest here.

Originally posted 2016-01-27 17:06:51. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

How to get a million more dollars

The Free Money Finance website recently reported on a Fox Business article about the value of education. Here’s the average lifetime earnings of a typical worker working 40 years:

  • Non-high school graduates: $936k
  • High school graduates: $1.1 million
  • Some college: $1.6 million
  • Associate’s degree: $1.8 million
  • Bachelor’s degree: $2.4 million
  • Master’s degree: $3.5 million
  • Doctoral degree: $3.5 million
  • Professional degree: $4.2 million

What the article noticed was that workers graduating from college earn over a million more dollars in their life compared to a high school graduate. It’s the difference between $20,000 a year and $60,000. More than anything, this shows that college pays off. Even though college is a long ways away for 4th and 5th graders, wise students will start to get ready now by making their brains as smart as they can. That means using class time wisely, learning what they need to learn, finishing tasks, fixing problems, and working at home each night a little to get smarter.

A good income is within reach for anyone that works for it. And students can start working for it by getting as smart as they can. Because the best way to go to college is with scholarships earned by great academic performance!

Read the whole article here.

Originally posted 2016-10-27 16:12:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Lead your child to good health

Here’s an infographic from the American College of Pediatricians on ways to help your student live a balanced and healthy life:

Originally posted 2017-11-06 20:59:09. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What to say to your student when things get tough

Has someone ever said to you, “Just try it, it’s easy!” and then you found out the task they coaxed you into trying was painfully difficult? Did this leave you feeling exceptionally capable or downright stupid…and embarrassed?

When this happens to the average adult, it doesn’t take long for them to conclude two things:

  • This person who’s trying to help me is nuts…and definitely not to be trusted!
  • Why should I try if I can’t even handle the easy stuff?

Quite frequently I overhear well-meaning parents and educators using the “Just try it, it’s easy!” approach in an attempt to urge a reluctant child into trying something they’re afraid of. When the child finds the task easy, all is right with the world. When they don’t, they’re confronted with the pain of seeing that they might be so slow that they can’t even do something really, really “easy”!

Keep reading to find out how to help motivate your student to keep working through difficult tasks.

Originally posted 2011-09-22 16:57:17. Republished by Blog Post Promoter